Events

If you have a relevant event you would like to have posted here, please email us at philosophersforsustainability@gmail.com.

Thursday, April 16th, 10:30am-12pm EDT

This is a time of many adjustments, some of them fruitful, others just difficult. We had been planning to build support for sustainable practices across philosophy by organizing a coordinated wave of local events on sustainability throughout our members’ countries. Those events now have to wait, at least in person, though we will pick up that project as soon as it seems doable.

In the meantime, we thought it might be helpful to have a Forum on Handling Emergencies, on Thursday, April 16, to talk through struggles and strategies for handling multiple global crises at the same time. We have students in crisis, we are panicked and/or slowed down ourselves, we’re transitioning to new formats, and whatever happens with the coronavirus, climate change is still getting worse. There is every reason to collaborate, stick together, and learn from each other. We propose that those of us who are able and interested get together to consider questions like these:

  • What are we, our colleagues, and our students going through? How does a global emergency affect our work, or vice versa? What lessons can we learn this year?
  • What kinds of responses can effectively address COVID-19 and the climate crisis at the same time, without allowing one to make us forget the other?
  • How can we make room for personal experiences of emergency in the classroom and in writing? In what ways, if any, should we help people temporarily put those experiences aside to focus on other philosophical issues?
  • How can we set a good tone as teachers and writers? What are good sources of humor about climate change and the coronavirus?
  • What kinds of online interaction strategies and other resources are helpful for philosophers and philosophy students in a state of emergency?

You can join for just part of the time if you need to, and you are welcome to eat or drink during the Forum. We hope you can make it– and please feel free to invite any other philosophers, whether or not they are members of Philosophers for Sustainability!


To join the forum, please email philosophersforsustainability@gmail.com to receive call-in instructions.

On Wednesday-Friday, April 22-24, the 50th anniversary of Earth Day will be marked with major online events, including many local events around the world, to bring people together and offer direction and purpose in the fight against climate change. These are held largely by and for young people, and are a great thing to include in long days at home with children! You can find an overview and a global event map here. You might also be interested in the We Don’t Have Time Climate Conference and other Earth Day Week events.

Call For Abstracts!

The Global Association of Master’s in Development Practice Programs (MDP), in collaboration with the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN), will hold the Eighth Annual International Conference on Sustainable Development (ICSD) on 21-22 September, 2020 in New York City. If you would like to present at the conference, you must submit an abstract as directed below. The conference is also open to observers (i.e. non-presenters). Simply register on the conference website to join us.

The conference theme is Cross-Cutting Solutions for the Decade of Action. The aim of the conference is to bring together persons involved in research, policy, practice, and business. Participants will share practical solutions for achieving the SDGs at local and national levels. Abstracts should be directly relevant to one of the following topics:

1. Children, Youth, and the SDGs

The universal nature of the SDGs demands a focus on, and engagement with, children and youth, who represent the future of sustainable development. Children and youth figure centrally in addressing each of the 17 SDGs, yet UNICEF estimates that 75% of child-related SDG indicators are either missing data or don’t show adequate momentum for achievement by 2030. This panel invites papers on theories and practices that consider the needs, interests, and voices of children and youth, as future leaders in sustainable development. Susan Murphy & Karen Brown

2. Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction for Cities

Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) and Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) priorities, when cross-cut with the city’s development sectors in formulating solutions for the city’s problems, ensure the sustainable development and resilience of such cities. Thus, it is imperative to mainstream CCA and DRR in the city’s comprehensive development planning. Tabassam Raza, Carmelita Liwag, & Jun Castro

3. Cross-cutting, Just Solutions Towards the Sustainability of the Energy System

Energy is one of the main sources of climate impact, as well as a source of environmental, economic, and social sustainability concerns on a global scale. Cross cutting solutions are much needed in this core sector to achieve this century’s ambitious sustainability goals. This session will explore innovative solutions to decarbonize the energy system that will increase its resiliency without creating new social issues. Maurizio Cellura, Francesco Guarino, Tatyana Lanshina, & Igor Makarov 

4. Democratizing Renewable Energy in the Global South

Several studies have shown that increased electricity access advances socio-economic development, brings about rapid industrialization, reduces poverty, improves food security, and increases quality of life and social well-being of the population. This session seeks analyses of the obstacles to achieving universal access to modern energy services in the Global South, and solutions to providing services in resource-poor settings, particularly field and pilot studies. Femi Oyeniyi, Labode Popoola, Ngozi Ifeoma Odiaka, & Famous Chiemerie

4. Economics and Demography of Natural Disasters and Disease Outbreak

As climate change rapidly continues, so does the consequence of increased natural disasters. This session will explore the populations who are affected by these disasters and identify best practices in resiliency. Hiroaki Matsuura & Keiichi Sato

5. Effective Industrial Policy to Achieve the SDGs

Effective industrial policy can have many benefits, such as reducing poverty and safeguarding the enviroment, but is dependent on systems including quality education and healthcare. This session will explore the design and implementation of cross-cutting policies to enable sustainable, inclusive industrial development to support SDG achievement. Pádraig Carmody & James Murphy

6. Food Production, Waste Management, and the Circular Economy

Food production is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions and waste. However, in the context of a circular economy food losses and waste become potential resources. This session will examine how the circular economy, food production, and waste management can meet to provide solutions to the environmental issues posed by food production and waste. John Dilyard, Sintia Molina, & Sarah K. Ku

7. Gender-based Innovations for Equitable SDG Outcomes

We use the word “gender” to denote both biological characteristics and socio-cultural factors that can be shown through evidence as influencing results and differentiating quality of outcomes for women and men. As a cross-cutting issue, gender analyses should be applied across clusters of interdependent SDGs. Our session will show what role different stakeholders can play to advance this. Elizabeth Pollitzer, Heisook Lee, & Ylann Schemm

8. ICT Standards for the Sustainable Development Goals

International emerging technology standards are living documents evolving alongside the technologies. As ICT becomes more intertwined with development practices, how can standardization in AI, Big Data, and IoT help achieve the SDGs? Ray Walshe & Jon Mason

9. Indigenous Approaches to the Sustainable Development Goals

Indigenous approaches to sustainable development relates to the importance of seeking diverse models through respectful partnerships with indigenous communities. Doing work in a “good way” is central to the indigenous way of practice. This session will examine case studies and projects undertaken through such partnerships, with a special interest in applying traditional models in both urban and rural settings. Dave Wilsey & Tamara Dionne Stout

10. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Teaching Sustainable Development

Cross-cutting solutions for sustainable development require creative thinking and thoughtful post-secondary educational systems. Interdisciplinary approaches across university-level education allow students to learn the deep interrelation between people, planet, and profit, and should be further examined for the Decade of Action. This session will present and discuss innovative ways of delivering education that enables and empowers graduates and future decision-makers to become the change-makers the world needs. Meredith Storey, Lucia Rodriguez, Martin Lehmann, Aida Guerra, Alicia Powers, & Kate Thornton

11. Multidisciplinary Energy Education for Societal Well-being

Transforming both the societal and physical dimensions of energy systems is fundamental for addressing climate change, community welfare, and environmental justice. This session will extract lessons from diverse examples of multidisciplinary energy education, particularly university-level and online forums, that hold promise for inspiring and equipping a wide range of learners to help society navigate energy transitions in the decade of action. Amanda Graham, Greg Poelzer, & Jennie Stephens

12. Nature Based Solutions to Climate Change

Nature based solutions are natural ways of remedying environmental problems and can play an integral roll in reversing the effects of climate change. This session will explore how to induce sustainable consumption with the help of nature and technology. Patrick Paul Walsh & Simone Cresti

13. Safe, Affordable, and Inclusive Transport under the SDGs

The provision of inclusive transportation is essential to leaving no one behind in pursuit of the SDGs. Understanding and accounting for how transport impacts people of different ages, incomes, genders, and abilities is required to ensure equitable access to economic and social aspects of development as well as resiliency in the face of complex environmental pressures. This session will feature presentations that emphasize how safe and inclusive transportation can and should be a part of plans, policies, and programs aimed at advancing one or all of the SDGs. Steven Jones & Tina Kempin Reuter

14. Socio-technical Solutions for Water-Energy-Food Security Challenges

Several SDGs are inextricably linked, particularly those relating to water, energy, and food. The proposed session will look at innovative socio-technical solutions to accelerate SDG progress at all scales. Bassel Daher & Rabi H. Mohtar

15. Sustainable Land Use Planning

Sustainable land use planning is about making conscientious decisions to safeguard soil, water, and living organisms for the longterm production of goods to meet changing human needs, while ensuring the maintenance of ecosystems and the services they provide. Because f the inter-dependency and interrelatedness of soil, water, the atmosphere, and human systems, cross-cutting solutions are essential for achieving the SDGs. Sathaporn Monprapussorn & Teerawet Titseesang

16. Sustainable Ports and the Circular Economy

Ports are places where multiple systems collide – shipping, energy, waste, tourism, and transport; Further, they are emissions hotspots. Maritime hubs can be catalysts for reversing the fast-growing emissions from international shipping if cross-cutting solutions are applied. Phoebe Koundouri, Nicolaos Theodossiou, & Andreas Papandreou

17. Turning Supply Chains Into Engines to Support the SDGs

A consequence of globalization has been the creation of highly complex cross-national supply chains on which companies, particularly multinational enterprises (MNEs), depend on to produce and distribute goods and services. Because the entities that make up these supply chains often are those which can most benefit from achieving the SDGs, such as 1 and 8, examining the ways in which the achievement of the SDGs can be made a core objective of the management of a supply chain should lead to change-making action. John Dilyard & Shasha Zhao

18. Universities Driving Collaborative Solutions for the Decade of Action

This session will explore how universities are transforming themselves or operating in new ways to scale up impact and support societal transformations during the decade of action. In this session, we will emphasize studies that look at cross-cutting solutions, multi-stakeholder processes, and the internal enabling conditions that allow transformations to be taken to scale. The format of this session will be slighty different, with presentations of only 5 to 7 minutes to allow for more discussion and dialogue. Further, the submission of a conference paper is optional. Julio Lumbreras, Tahl Kestin, & Andrea Cuesta Claros

A more detailed description of each theme can be found here. Interested presenters should submit an abstract of at least 300 words but not exceeding 500 words, in English, by 1 May, 2020, via the conference website. Each abstract may only be submitted once and under one Topic. Failure to answer questions on the submission form or the submission of the same abstract under multiple topics is likely to result in the abstract being declined.

The scientific committee will review abstracts and send all decision letters by 1 June, 2020. Abstracts can be accepted as either poster or oral (i.e. PowerPoint) presentations. Presenters invited to give oral presentations must submit a full paper by 1 August, 2020, in order to maintain their position in the program. Presenters failing to submit full papers will be moved to poster presentations. Presenters who do not register before the 1 September, 2020 deadline may also forfeit their spot in the agenda.

July 6th-9th, 2020 — Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada

Website: https://unic2020.ulaval.ca/summit-unic2020/

In July 2020, Université Laval in Québec city, Canada will host the International Student Summit on Climate. A world first, the UniC2020 Summit will bring together some 300 university students and recent graduates from around the world, selected for their commitment to climate action. Participants will not only have the opportunity to network and share ideas, but also to collaborate on concrete initiatives through the future International Student Climate Network.

The UniC2020 Summit will be a distinctive event insofar as the programming is structured around five main dimensions of university student life. Each will be explored in relation to climate transition and climate action issues, from a perspective of global sustainability. And each will be approached in a transversal way, including as it pertains to indigenous knowledge, the taking into account of marginalized people, etc.

Learn all about UniC2020 and submit your application!

July 6-9, 2020
H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Blue River, Oregon

This call for papers solicits 500-word proposals for presentations on any topic in environmental philosophy. However, special attention will be given to proposals for talks concerning issues connected with first-order normative claims, initiatives, and action in response to the range of environmental threats connected to climate change, biodiversity loss, mass extinction, pollution, and ecosystem degradation.

An escalating rhetoric of a “crisis” or “emergency” has accompanied an increase of public awareness about harmful climate impacts and degraded environmental conditions. With some regularity, we hear that observed phenomena either meet or exceed the worst-case scenarios within a suite of possible trajectories. Predicted changes in the natural world are unfolding more rapidly than expected, e.g. loss of Arctic ice, and international pledges to act are simply not being met, as global GHG emissions continue to grow. Empirical studies reveal surprising and deeply troubling information about, for example, the collapse of insect and bird populations, while some powerful right-wing and authoritarian political leaders only exacerbate the problems, e.g. Trump’s withdraw from the Paris Agreement and Bolsonaro’s policies of deforestation and development in the Amazon.

In response, there has been growing youth-led, political engagement, exemplified by the international school strikes for climate action and the U.S. Sunrise Movement, as well as a return to non-violent direct action (e.g., by Extinction Rebellion in the UK). One widespread refrain asserts we have only 12 years to radically transform society, which calls for a mobilization equivalent to those made to fight world wars. How should we think about that? While environmental philosophy has traditionally focused on theory, concepts, and ideological frameworks (e.g. conceptions of intrinsic value, anthropocentrism, and environmental justice), the theme of this conference is to focus on praxis, conduct, behavior, and concrete action: How can philosophy help us understand and engage with conditions that call us to action? How can we do activism well in the climate arena, both strategically and ethically? What will future generations, in retrospect, think we should be doing today?

July 6th-9th, 2020 — H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Blue River, Oregon, USA

CFP: Technology and the Future of the Home

Keynote Speaker: Diane Michelfelder, Macalester College

Research on how we conceptualize the home is increasing across the academy. However, studies about how technology challenges our conceptualization of the home require focus.  The purpose of this colloquium is to develop and advance such conversations.  Although submissions that interpret the home are welcome, abstracts focused on guiding its development to create a better world are highly encouraged.  All disciplinary backgrounds and approaches are welcome. The scope of topics is open, but some motivational lines of inquiry include how the future of the home intersects with the following areas:

Smart Cities

Digital Divide

Interior Design 

Future Meanings 

Food Sovereignty 

IoT in the Home

Universal Design

Alternative Housing

 Zoning and Regulations

Disability Considerations

Architectural Inspirations

Implementation Subsidies

The Home as an Ecosystem

Challenges to Existing Infrastructure

Generational Differences and Challenges

Cohousing, Ecovillages and Intentional Communities

There is no registration fee. Upload anonymized abstracts of 250-350 words by June 15, 2020: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=tfh2020

While participation in the event does not guarantee publication, participants can submit revised versions of their papers to a special issue of the Journal of Sociotechnical Critique, subject to peer review and alignment with the aims and scope of the journal. Questions? shane.epting@mst.edu

Brought to you with support from the Center for Science, Technology, and Society at Missouri University of Science and Technology, Journal of Sociotechnical Critique, Center for Environmental Philosophy at the University of North Texas, Philosophy of the City Research Group, and the Interdisciplinary Environmental Association.

September 21-22, 2020 — New York, NY USA

Conference Website: https://ic-sd.org/

Our Mission

The International Conference on Sustainable Development (ICSD) provides a forum for academia, government, civil society, UN agencies, and the private sector to come together to share practical solutions to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

History

In 2013, an ocean away from New York, a meeting was held in Dakar, Senegal, to find solutions to the complex challenges of sustainable development. Participants felt that a larger conference was needed to bring others into the dialogue, and thus in an auditorium at Université Cheikh Anta Diop, it was decided that the Global Association of Master’s in Development Practice programs would partner with the Sustainable Development Solutions Network to launch the first ICSD. The first ICSD took place in September 2013, followed by conferences in 20142015201620172018, and 2019. Soon it was time for the 8th ICSD, hosted in New York City by The Earth Institute, Columbia University, and their Center for Sustainable Development.

Why Attend?

Professor Jeffrey Sachs says it best:

This year’s International Conference on Sustainable Development will be the most important and historic yet! Not only will the science and policy be at the cutting edge; the conference will take place on multiple campuses around the world, making it a truly global event. ICSD will host students from around the world, top scientists, and world leaders from politics to government to the UN. I urge everybody interested in sustainable development – the great challenge of our age – to come to ICSD. Alas, space is limited, but we’ll pack in all that we can!

Who is in the Audience?

ICSD brings together professionals from the private sector, academia, government, and civil society, along with students from the world’s top universities. We welcome participants from all sectors and experience levels. Simply register and help us reach our target of 1,000!

About the Organizers

The Center for Sustainable Development (CSD) mobilizes the scientific expertise of the Earth Institute to create tools and research that shape new solutions to the challenges of sustainable development, and to provide policy support – as requested by governments and development organizations – to address these challenges in the context of a global society.

The Earth Institute, Columbia University, brings together the people and tools needed to address some of the world’s most difficult problems, from climate change and environmental degradation, to poverty, disease and the sustainable use of resources.

The Global Master’s in Development Practice (MDP), an interdisciplinary graduate degree program, prepares students to better identify and address the challenges of sustainable development. MDP programs generally consist of two years of coursework in four intersecting disciplines—health, natural, social, and management sciences–combined with cross-sectoral field training.

The Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) aims to accelerate joint learning and help to overcome the compartmentalization of technical and policy work by promoting integrated approaches to the interconnected economic, social, and environmental challenges confronting the world. The SDSN works closely with United Nations agencies, multilateral financing institutions, the private sector, and civil society.

July 6th-9th, 2020 — H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Blue River, Oregon, USA

CFP: Technology and the Future of the Home

Keynote Speaker: Diane Michelfelder, Macalester College

Research on how we conceptualize the home is increasing across the academy. However, studies about how technology challenges our conceptualization of the home require focus.  The purpose of this colloquium is to develop and advance such conversations.  Although submissions that interpret the home are welcome, abstracts focused on guiding its development to create a better world are highly encouraged.  All disciplinary backgrounds and approaches are welcome. The scope of topics is open, but some motivational lines of inquiry include how the future of the home intersects with the following areas:

Smart Cities

Digital Divide

Interior Design 

Future Meanings 

Food Sovereignty 

IoT in the Home

Universal Design

Alternative Housing

 Zoning and Regulations

Disability Considerations

Architectural Inspirations

Implementation Subsidies

The Home as an Ecosystem

Challenges to Existing Infrastructure

Generational Differences and Challenges

Cohousing, Ecovillages and Intentional Communities

There is no registration fee. Upload anonymized abstracts of 250-350 words by June 15, 2020: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=tfh2020

While participation in the event does not guarantee publication, participants can submit revised versions of their papers to a special issue of the Journal of Sociotechnical Critique, subject to peer review and alignment with the aims and scope of the journal. Questions? shane.epting@mst.edu

Brought to you with support from the Center for Science, Technology, and Society at Missouri University of Science and Technology, Journal of Sociotechnical Critique, Center for Environmental Philosophy at the University of North Texas, Philosophy of the City Research Group, and the Interdisciplinary Environmental Association.

Planning to reschedule October, November 2020 — Online

Website: https://www.climateconference2020.net/

Climate Injustice is an online academic conference that brings together an audience from around the globe to reflect on individual responsibility in the face of climate change. The conference is groundbreaking both because of its under-theorized theme and because of its revolutionary format.

Theme
We conduct our lives within institutions that may be destroying civilization as we know it. We know the mechanism through which we are doing this, and our voluntary actions contribute to it. Global structural responses are slow and uncertain. Individual responses suffer from uncertainty and inefficacy. And yet to suppose that individuals need do nothing, while governments dither, seems preposterous. What, then, should individuals do? How does the climate-related injustice of our institutions implicate us? How should we – as individuals or as members of states, social groups, or associations – conduct ourselves in light of it? That is the problem, broadly speaking, that this conference seeks to address.

Format
The conference, encompassing Earth Day 2020, is a “rolling” 36-hour online event, continuing across all time zones and bringing together speakers and discussants from all inhabited continents. Conducted entirely online, the conference minimizes participation barriers and aims to be inclusive of a genuinely global set of perspectives on this urgent problem. Unlike in-person conferences, presentations and discussions will be archived so that they can be accessed in perpetuity. The format also eliminates the climate-altering emissions associated with conference travel.

The conference will feature eight plenary speakers from around the world. Each plenary will have a commentator, whose brief reflections on the paper will be followed by a Q&A session open to all participants.

PAST EVENTS

Saturday, March 21st, 1-2:30 EST

As part of moving our field toward a sustainable future, we are excited to announce a March Forum on E-conferencing, on Saturday, March 21, 1-2:30pm EST (east coast USA and Canada time). Part of this forum will be a discussion of e-conferencing and e-vents more generally, with their advantages and disadvantages, and opportunities for advocacy in our field, from requesting an e-colloquium as part of a colloquium series to putting on smaller and larger e-vents. We hope to hear from some of you about what you have tried, how it has gone, and/or what you might try next. We will then turn to a discussion of what our own e-conference might look like, and collect suggestions and feedback toward getting started on organizing an e-conference to take place this fall.

We are adding a few short in-progress documents for discussion; please take a look before the Forum if you can.

  1. A short draft collection of selling points for e-conferencing, with some objections and replies, by Colin Marshall
  2. An initial proposal for a Philosophers for Sustainability e-conference, up for discussion
  3. Notes toward an e-vents how-to guide, by Eric Godoy
  4. An (optional) longer guide to “nearly carbon neutral” conferencing, by Ken Hiltner

In the meantime, please let us know if you are interested in being involved in a Philosophers for Sustainability e-conference as a co-organizer or helping with logistics, technical support, refereeing, or in some other way.


To join the forum, please email philosophersforsustainability@gmail.com to receive call-in instructions.